Roselle Kovitz – A profile by Angie McCullagh

It was in the sunny college town of Claremont, California that Roselle Kovitz, daughter of a radio man and an artist-teacher mom, discovered her love for writing. She says that Claremont, designed to echo ivy league schools, along with her parents’ high regard for education, contributed to her curiosity and interest in learning. 

An imaginative kid, she found it easy to submerge herself in stories and ideas.
 
Ironically, a love for reading never bit her as hard as the writing bug. “My mother was puzzled by the fact that, at an early age, I excelled at writing even though I didn’t have the same appetite for reading.”
 
Although Roselle gravitates toward nonfiction, she was drawn to Willa Cather’s description of the prairie years before moving to Nebraska, enjoys Maya Angelou and John O’Donohue, among others, and paging through one of her favorites, The Sun Magazine.
 
“When I read something lyrical, beautiful or stunning, either in the way it’s written or the message it conveys, it can shift or open something in me. I want my writing to connect with people in that way.”
 
Nowadays, Roselle pens essays and poetry. She writes, she says, as a process of discovery and a way to connect with herself and others. She also writes web content professionally and co-authored the book A History of Public Broadcasting (http://www.amazon.com/History-Public-Broadcasting-John-Witherspoon/dp/0967746302).
Ballard is a great place for her writerly existence. “I love the combination of the water and evergreens. Ballard is small enough to feel quite comfortable, with all the benefits of the city. I’ve gotten to know some wonderful and talented people here whom I treasure and who teach me about writing and life.”
 
Though she isn’t married, she claims a wonderful step-daughter and enjoys walks, yoga, lingering conversations with friends and, occasionally collage.
 
Her dreams for the future are varied and, yes, imaginative. She occasionally fantasizes about designing shoes for vegetarians (she went to shoe school in Port Townsend years ago) and creating a television series about a healing center in the San Juan Islands. Mostly though, she says she wants to become more present, loving, compassionate, and creative. As far as writing goes, if those qualities were to spill into other’s lives through Roselle’s words, “that,” she says,  ”would be wonderful.”